Connected, but Alone?

We all depend on technology to get us through the day- it’s true. What we may not realize, however, is that we are becoming more disconnected from the real world when we spend most of our time on our devices. Just because you are always on social media, seeing what others are up to, doesn’t mean you are truly connected with them.

Recently in technology class, we watched a TedTalk by Sherry Turkle that talked about how we are becoming more and more reliant on technology, and less connected with others around us. While I was watching, I realized that I agreed with most of what Sherry said.

For one, I tend to check my phone a lot throughout the day. Whether it’s because I have notifications from social media sites, texts from friends, or I’m just bored, I find myself constantly reaching for my phone. Sometimes even spending almost an hour using it.

And it’s not just me. It has happened many times where I’m sitting with friends, wanting to talk and socialize, only to find everybody else on their phones and I feel like I’m sitting alone. Just like Eeman said in her post, The World of Technology, many people feel as though their phone is their best friends, and they absolutely cannot live without it.

Public Domain from Pixabay

Sherry also talked about how most people prefer to text rather than talk to others in person. Sure, texting may be quicker and more efficient than talking face- to- face, but that doesn’t mean it should be our main way of communicating.

Over and over I hear, “I would rather text than talk.” ~Sherry Turkle

I’m glad to say that I am not one of those people who would rather text. I find it much more entertaining and real when I talk to my friends face- to- face, compared to when we text. When talking online, we have the ability to present a specific side of ourselves to others, the ‘better’ side, and we can be completely different people. That’s why I feel the conversations I have online are almost fake or robotic since they lack emotion.

So what do you do? Next time you’re sitting with a group of people, put your phone aside. Try to socialize. Have real conversationsIf you still find yourself reaching for your phone to check for notifications, turn it off. Do whatever it takes to actually, truly connect.

This applies to me, too. Lately, my friends and I have been making an effort to not let our devices distract us from each other. Whenever we get together to hang out, our phones lay forgotten, taking pictures being the only reason we might need to use our devices for.